Feminism and fairy tales

Each one read like a parody, like fairy tales deliberately written in an overly preachy and silly manner to mock people being offended by actual folklore. The emphasis will be away from wealth, beauty, and youth, and men and women will be shown to have equal opportunities.

A shepherd unthinking puts on a gold ring, which matches one on the statue and which he can't remove. Walker's "Cinder-Helle" is an adaptation of Cinderella in which a woman was formerly a powerful priestess of the Mother Goddess until Evil Christian Men killed or oppressed everyone. As for the fairy tales themselves, I got nothing of any value out of them.

That's not me jumping to conclusions, incidentally. After the poisoned apple is dislodged, prince and princess work in the mine and together they build a cottage and live happily ever after, "working together, sharing their lives and their love.

Goddess forbid eye roll they actually be women who want to love and have sex with each other. After a period of time, the shepherd vanishes and his sister finds him dead, locked in an embrace with the statue.

The hunter spares Snow White because of his humanity and concern for what she can make of her life rather than because he loves her. The group complains that fairy stories relegate people to definite "sex role," and women are not expected to determine their destiny.

Because that makes much more sense than calling the guards to arrest him for talking about killing a princess.

In the group's altered Snow White, the queen is jealous of Snow White's happiness and liveliness rather than her beauty. Reading Walker's attempts to educate on folklore and mythology is like listening to Lucy Van Pelt explain that leaves fall from trees so squirrels can't eat them.

Okay, I could buy she was traumatized even though she seems to get over it pretty quicklybut then the huntsman tries to get the queen to condone him killing Snow and the queen, obviously grasping what he wants to do, calls the idea "obnoxious" and orders him to leave, summoning seven dwarfs to look after Snow until the huntsman tries to kill her.

From the archive, 11 February 1971: New feminist versions of classic fairy tales

It's also admirable if a woman uses magic to forcibly change her entire country into what SHE thinks is the ideal society, without thinking about the consequences or whether or not anyone else wants this.

Apparently there aren't any truly devout Christian women, because Walker takes it as a given that women are repressed and brainwashed by Christianity. I suppose the two good things that came of this story were that I had a desire to seek out genuinely good retellings and I learned a lot about 70s feminism.

The heroines are not independent or brave or self-sufficient. Her cardboard love interest. I really, really hate to say this, because I don't like to suggest that there is a right or wrong school of feminism, but this is just backwards.

Having re-read this anthology, I would like to report that Disney movies are not the only things Walker plagiarized. The Cinderella retelling was exactly the same as the regular Cinderella, except in I thought the first couple stories were okay, and then I got tired of reading about the cauldron and the crone and how wonderful and wise women are even when they actually are depicted as petty, passive, and stupid in many stories.

Feminist Fairy Tales

She hammers readers over the heads with the same messages: Do yourselves a favor and skip this one. The fairy tale is about a young, talented spinner named Renelde, who looks forward to marrying her sweetheart, Guilbert.

And really, Walker, do you want to teach your readership that their Barbie dolls secretly sneer at them for having underdeveloped breasts. Men are usually viscous, ugly brutes who attack women with no warning and little motivation.

Around this time, the statue also changes position. Not because there's no evidence for it, nope. To read more about the Merseyside Women Liberation Movement's efforts to address gender inequality in fairy stories, click here for an article from July Also, women should only marry kind men not for happiness but because of some creepy eugenics-sounding idea that breeding only with kind, intelligent men means all the brutish thugs will die out forever.

There are plenty of better talking fish in the sea. Women are always good and loving and kind and nurturing. Witches and plucky girls, princesses and vampires: In fairy tales, at least, females have power.

While feminism has long mined fables and folk tales for both archetypes and answers, filmmakers have done the same to create arresting heroines and villains, along with strong characters who straddle the line. I think two other female characters from the Disney lineup portray feminism in a much stronger light, and I don’t know whether these movies were based off of fairy tales, they are Mulan and Merida too strong warrior/women able to fend for themselves.

Framed by a critical survey of feminist fairy-tale scholarship and an extensive bibliography-the most comprehensive listing of women-centered fairy-tale research ever assembled-Fairy Tales and Feminism is a valuable resource for anyone interested in the intersection of fairy tales and feminism/5(2).

Fairy Tales and Feminism is a rich and readable book that covers a broad spectrum in time and space. Several appearances of the fairy tale occur in a balanced equilibrium, from seventeenth-century story-tellers to the early twenty-first-century TV shows.

Witches and plucky girls, princesses and vampires: In fairy tales, at least, females have power. While feminism has long mined fables and folk tales for both archetypes and answers, filmmakers have done the same to create arresting heroines and villains, along with strong characters who straddle the.

From the archive, 11 February 1971: New feminist versions of classic fairy tales

Framed by a critical survey of feminist fairy-tale scholarship and an extensive bibliography-the most comprehensive listing of women-centered fairy-tale research ever assembled-Fairy Tales and Feminism is a valuable resource for anyone interested in the intersection of fairy tales and lanos-clan.coms: 2.

Feminism and fairy tales
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